Coping with Senioritis

Courtesy+of+www.highschool.latimes.com
Courtesy of www.highschool.latimes.com

Courtesy of www.highschool.latimes.com

Courtesy of www.highschool.latimes.com

Ashley Chase ‘18, Student Life Section Editor

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Marymount High School is in the midst of an epidemic. With evidence confirming our worst fears, the signs are everywhere. The wails of despairing seniors ring out through the halls of Butler, and students claw their way to the buses at the end of the day. All this can mean only one thing: senioritis has made its way onto campus.

We cannot stand by as this outbreak ravages our school. It is time that we contemplate this crippling disease and how we can defeat it. Senioritis is commonly defined as an illness plaguing students near the end of their high school and college careers. Sufferers of the condition may experience severe laziness, impatience, and a lack of motivation to study.

When left untreated, victims’ performance on academic and extracurricular activities decline, causing feelings of guilt and sadness. In extreme cases, colleges may even rescind their acceptance decisions for a senior whose grades drop lower than expected. Though graduation offers a certain cure, there are many steps one can take to protect oneself and one’s loved ones before it’s too late.

  1. Resist the all-or-nothing mentality. Many seniors have spent years stressing over school in an attempt for perfection. The pressure to work hard is exhausting, and now that the end is near, we feel reluctant to work. The danger lies in our temptation to drop everything. If you feel unmotivated to start your math homework, don’t use that excuse to ignore all of your other tasks. Seeking balance is key.
  2. Ask for help. Laziness is difficult to beat, but finding someone to keep you accountable can prove extremely helpful. It is preferable that you find a person who is not a senior to help motivate you, whether that be a parent, teacher, or counselor. When you feel zero motivation, this person can help bring you back to your goals.
  3. Remind yourself of how hard you have worked. You have spent four years cultivating your talents, character, and knowledge. Why should you jeopardize all your effort when you are so close to the finish line? You put work into being the person you are today, and it would be a shame to bring your growth to an abrupt end. There is still time to improve. Do everything you can to end strong.
  4. Enjoy yourself. Seniors often slack off on their schoolwork because, in the past, they have pulled all-nighters just for their assignments. Now is the time to put yourself first. If you crave free time, giving yourself opportunities to recharge will make you less likely to splurge.
  5. Mark your calendar. With March upon us, there remain only two months left of school. Remember that you are so close to the finish line, and constantly remind yourself of this if you feel like you cannot get out of bed in the morning. Time inevitably goes on, and you will make it!
  6. Stay away. Senioritis is highly contagious. It is a good idea to avoid carriers of the pathogen, who may negatively influence you.
  7. Think about your parents, coaches, teachers, etc. They spent four years funding your education, supporting you, and helping you grow. When you find yourself in sloth-mode, think about the people who are constantly cheering for you. Make them proud.
  8. Set daily, short-term goals. Some days graduation feels close, and other days it feels years away. On those tougher days, assign yourself a few tasks for the day so that you can keep yourself productive. Identifying responsibilities will motivate you to complete them.
  9. Sleep. Nothing makes a person more sluggish and unhappy to be at school than a lack of sleep. Stay fresh and alert, and it is more likely that you will continue to work hard.
  10. Focus on the experience. If grades simply don’t matter to you anymore, think about the meaning behind your time at Marymount. You are here for a fantastic education and a tight-knit community of sailor sisters. Come to class because you love the material. Come to school to cherish the last few months you have with your classmates. Naturally, the results you want and the grades you need will follow.

Though the symptoms of senioritis may seem inescapable, there is certainly hope for recovery. Already, seniors have taken strides to make their last year something they can feel proud of!

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Coping with Senioritis